A cenote is a natural pit which was often created by the collapsing of the limestone bedrocks and which in return resulted in the exposure of the groundwater.

One of such cenotes, known as the Sacred Cenote, which is also known as the The Well of Sacrifice alternatively, was sacred to the Mayans, situated at Chichen Itza, which is now found to be a pre Columbian Mayan site for archeological studies, at the Northern side of the Yucatán Peninsula.

This specific cenote is called the Sacred Cenote because the Mayans believed that this cenote, with a few others amongst all of them, connected to the underworld which was sacred to them.

The Mayans used to worship the rain god of Maya who was known as Chaac, and to please him so that there was ample amount of rainfall and no draught, they sacrificed inanimated objects and sometimes, as morbid as it may sound, humans beings.

Idiot'story Sacred Cenote
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In the archeological digging of the present times, the archeologists have found out many objects and figurines made of gold, jade, obsidian, bone, cloth, pottery, shells, wood, flint etc, along with human skeletons.

Gold was some of the objects which were not native to the Mayans, and it denotes how strong they were trade wise, that they could throw away artifacts made of those materials into the water.

 

Idiot'story Sacred Cenote
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There were approximately 200 human skeletons found in the Sacred Cenote, which consisted of unfortunate humans of all age groups, including infants and babies, middle aged men and women, and old people. They were mostly people who were purchased at the slave market, or nobles who were captured in fights. Some of them were thrown alive in the water, while some were first killed and then had their dead bodies thrown in the water as a sacrifice to Chaac.

The Sacred Cenote continues to hold its mysteries even though it’s being explored everyday in the present time.