Nothing can soothe your eyes better than watching the California prison inmates battling the devastating California Wildfires. These inmates who look like regular firefighters, they could be seen wearing orange fire-resistant suits and with 60 pounds worth of support gear on their backs.

These brave men and women were seen on the front-lines of the wildfires. Holding chainsaws and hand tools, they went on stopping the fires from spreading.
Idiot`story California Prison Inmates Wildfires
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Idiot`story California Prison Inmates Wildfires
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“The inmates are all doing some form of conservation work every day that they are not on a fire line.”

BILL SESSA

IN THE LINE OF FIRE
Idiot`story California Prison Inmates Wildfires
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As per the corrections department, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) and the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, and the Los Angeles County Fire Department, together operate 43 adult safeguarding camps, or fire camps, all over the state.

According to Bill Sessa, a spokesman for the corrections department “The inmates are all doing some form of conservation work every day that they are not on a fire line.” Sessa says that these California prison inmates with the lowest security risk can offer their help for the program. These inmates are vetted for physical fitness for laborious work, discipline, teamwork and responsibility.

The selected candidates are perpetually assigned a camp and administered by corrections officers. If we believe the reports there are 3,800 inmates lodged at the camps. The inmates are given a two-week training. This training includes physical training and firefighting techniques by Cal Fire staff. These inmates cut containment lines using techniques such as clearing brush to control the wildfire from spreading. They move in a line with everyone having a task associated with the person in front or behind them. The aim of every inmate is to stop the fire.

“They move in a line with everyone having a task associated with the person in front or behind them. The aim of every inmate is to stop the fire.”

They stand between the homes and the fire to control the fire. Around 1,700 California prison inmates stand rigidly on front lines of the disastrous wildfires, and others help in other ways. These crews move everywhere around the state making sure not to leave any area unprotected.

Kudos to such brave hearts!!!

What are your thoughts on this initiative by the Dept. of Corrections? Have you come across similar stories? Do share with us in the comment section below.